God Bless our #GoodPolice but the #BadCops Have 2 Go!

SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF LIED TO ME: Nowhere has the Legislature indicated that the sheriff's powers and duties are limited to the unincorporated areas of the county. Nor is there any statutory language from which such a limitation might be inferred. We note, in addition, that the sheriff at common law was the chief law enforcement officer of the county, and that the office of sheriff retains its common law powers and duties unless modified by the constitution or statutes. Sheriffs, Police, and Constables § 2 (1987); seeState ex rel. Johnston v. Melton, 192 Wash. 379, 388-89, 73 P.2d 1334 (1937); AGO 51-53 No. 322 at 2. We thus conclude that the sheriff has a general duty to enforce state law in both unincorporated and incorporated areas of the county. "the jurisdiction of the sheriff in law enforcement matters normally extends throughout his county including the incorporated areas thereof." [The sheriff's] authority is county wide. He is not restricted by municipal limits. For better protection and for the enforcement of local ordinance[s] the [[Orig. Op. Page 4]] cities and towns have their police departments or their town marshals. Even the state has its highway patrol. Still the authority of the sheriff with his correlative duty remains.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Harvey Weinstein: Survivors of Police Sexual Abuse Ignored Again


First- To all the Brave Survivors of Police Sexual Abuse... I am so sorry this is happening again. Once again, the Media and this Country is rightfully upset over the newest discovery of Power, and Sexual abuse. During a time when Sexual abuse is finally being discussed, publicly & so many who hear of this abuse are taking a stand & saying No! This will not continue! Police Sexual Abuse is still being ignored. 

“This way of treating women ends now,” Ms. Paltrow said as she and other actresses accused the producer of casting-couch abuses.
During a time, much overdue, when survivors of Sexual Abuse are coming forward, no longer afraid of the hell they know is coming once they do, and during a time of 24 hour news cycle & social media, where Sexual Abuse is discussed in an open & honest platform, there is one form of Sexual Abuse that seems to stay out of the spotlight... Police Sexual Abuse. 

Sexual Abuse in the Entertainment world: Bill Cosby  now Harvey Weinstein Roger Ailes
Sexual Abuse in sports: Jerry Sandusky and so many more!
But what about Police Sexual Abuse
 Many of Weinstein's accusers were working in his films at the time of the alleged encounters. "They depended on him for their income, so they were afraid of losing that," Farrow tells NPR.
Two reasons may account for the allegations against Weinstein emerging now. First, many women have spoken out recently against other powerful men, including Bill Cosby, Donald Trump, Bill O'Reilly, and Roger Ailes. Second, Weinstein isn't as powerful in Hollywood as he once was. Farrow says that many of the executives and assistants he interviewed for his story told him that a factor in deciding to speak up was that Weinstein is now "less able to hurt them."

How is the Harvey Weinstein Sexual Abuse, the Bill Cosby Sexual Abuse, and all the other Sexual Abuse that everyone seems willing to discuss, openly, any different from Police Sexual Abuse. Here is how!

1. The Police Sexually Abuse at a rate higher than any other. Even what I call "Cop on Cop Sexual Abuse". 
2. Victims (Survivors) of Police Sexual Abuse, from fear, rarely come forward.
3. Reported cases of Police Sexual Abuse are, most often, never investigated outside of the police department of which the accused officer is employed.
4. The majority of reported Police Sexual Abuse is found "inconclusive".
5. Most states have no specific laws, in their statutes, that pertain to Police Sexual Abuse.
6. The average Victim/Survivor of Police Sexual Abuse will spend the rest of their life scared of the Police.
7. When the Victim/Survivor of Police Sexual Abuse is ignored, mistreated, lied to, threatened etc, after reporting Police Sexual Abuse, and perhaps cannot find a Lawyer or cannot afford to pay one, where can that citizen go for help? Their Legislators? Their Senators? No! 

We can no longer Ignore Police Sexual Abuse, and the Brave Survivors of Police Sexual Abuse, who feel worthless, forgotten, ignored, unworthy, as every news media, on TV and online, is 24/7 coverage of every other form of Sexual Abuse, when the only cases of Police Sexual Abuse that ever hit even the local news, are the high profile cases. Well, just like Cockroaches... For every one that you do see, there are 100 more that you don't! 
(CNN) Daniel Holtzclaw, the ex-Oklahoma City officer convicted of rape and other charges after he preyed on African-American women over six months, was sentenced Thursday to 263 years in prison, as recommended by the jury, according to his attorney.

Prosecutors said Holtzclaw selected victims in one of Oklahoma City's poorest neighborhoods based on their criminal histories, assuming their drug or prostitution records would undermine any claims they might make against him.
    Then, he would subject them to assaults that escalated from groping to oral sodomy and rape, according to the testimony of 13 victims. Holtzclaw, whose father is a police lieutenant on another force, waived his right to testify.

    Two of those women shared their stories with CNN on Wednesday, recounting horrific memories of being forced to perform sexual acts by a serial rapist with a badge who was supposed to protect and serve.

    While We Focus on Shootings, We Ignore Victims of Police Sexual Assault
                                                          ByDarnell L. Moore


    On Feb. 10, 2013, 31-year-old sheriff's deputy Cory Cooper pulled over a 19-year-old woman and her boyfriend in Omaha, Nebraska. After finding marijuana in the vehicle, Cooper ordered the boyfriend to toss the drug in the nearby Zorinsky Lake, according to the Omaha World-Herald. While the man was away, Cooper allegedly told the young woman to follow him back to his cruiser, where he asked her to remove her shirt. 
    The request was reportedly an ultimatum presented to the young woman to keep her boyfriend out of trouble. Cooper then exposed himself. 
    "All I could think was, 'What am I going to do to get out of this?' Nobody's going to believe me over the police," the victim told the World-Herald. 
    On April 15 of this year, Cooper took a plea deal that will allow him to escape a felony conviction. Despite the traumatizing nature of his crime, he will be served with misdemeanor charges of assault and attempted evidence tampering. He will serve a year in jail but won't have to register as a sexual offender. He still has law enforcement certification, though the World-Herald reports that will likely be stripped soon.
    This type of sexual violence by police is more common than it would seem. In fact, though now-familiar scenes of civilians, mostly black men, being beaten, shot or choked by law enforcement have rightly provoked the ire of the American public, sexual misconduct is the nation's second most reported allegation of officer misconduct, according to a 2013 report by the Cato Institute. Nevertheless, broad narratives of police brutality tend to ignore both female victims and the often specific nature of the violence leveled against them in favor of focusing on the highly visible use of weapons to kill men.

    "Safety, in light of police brutality, means organizing against racial-sexual violence," community organizer Ahmad Greene-Hayes, who works with Black Lives Matter: NYC and Black Women's Blueprint, told Mic. "Police officers can be killers, but they can also be rapists." 
    Women are subject not only to differential forms of violence by police, but also to entrenched stereotypes surrounding sexual assault, which may further inhibit their seeking justice for this abuse. Anti-sexual assault advocates have long argued law enforcement fails to adequately protect and serve survivors of assault. As such, "women too often find themselves at the mercy of police agencies that neglect women's safety, whether by ignoring women's allegations of abuse by an officer or making light of crimes reported by women," Deborah Jacobs, a consultant in gender and race policy and police practices, told Mic via email.
    This issue may be multiplied for "black women with the least [economic and social] privilege, who live in the most dangerous situations," University of Illinois professor Beth E. Ritchie writes in her book Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America's Prison Nation. Instead, these women "are criminalized instead of being are supported."
    "Police officers can be killers, but they can also be rapists."
    Indeed, the force of blue-on-pink violence is compounded by racism and racial disparities within the criminal justice system. The lifetime rate of rape and attempted rapes is higher for black and mixed-race women than it is for white women, and black women were incarcerated at 3.75 times the rate of white women in 2008, according to the Women's Prison Association. Given such an environment, one could reasonably conclude that women of color may be subject to disproportionate rates of sexual violence from law officers.
    This collusion of sexual assault, racism and state-sanctioned violence has intimately affected black women's lives. In his 2010 book on police brutality, for example, author Leonard Moore details the story of a 23-year old black woman who was the victim of an alleged sexual assault by three white police officers in New Orleans in 1959. Moore writes that the victim "identified her attacker [at the arraignment trial] and testified that he removed her pants and raped her and that she did not scream and yell because no one was around and because she had been afraid of police since she was a child." The all-white jury acquitted the three officers.
    The issue no doubt has roots in the history of slavery and segregation, and the subsequent social denial of black women's bodily autonomy. "In the segregated American South, a white man could rape a black woman with little fear of legal or social recourse, and black women lived in a persistent state of apprehension," Sheri Parks wrote in the Washington Post
    Los Angeles Police Department Vice Squad In South Central Los Angeles  Robert Nickelsberg
    This pattern of racialized sexual assault committed by police continues today. Less than a year ago in Oklahoma City, in August 2014, former police officer Daniel Ken Holtzclaw was arrested on multiple charges, including sexual battery, rape and forcible oral sodomy. All seven of his victims, aged 34 to 58, were black women. Yet there has been no nationwide cry for justice for these horrific crimes. 
    "In the same places where police-involved shooting deaths of black cisgender men take place, black cisgender and transgender women are pummeled to death, gunned down, sexually harassed and raped," Greene-Hayes told Mic. "However, our movements have only focused on the former. Historically, we have paid more attention to the effects of lynching, for example, for black men, only to deny that black women were also lynched and that there was and continues to be a sexual dimension undergirding white supremacy."
    One reason sexual misconduct cases may occur without the same outcry as that against gun violence is the public's unwillingness to recognize women as victimsof police misconduct in the first place. But the silence that results when women are sexually victimized also reflects the more insidious problem of rape culture. Slut shaming and victim blaming are common practices reflecting our society's belief that women are at fault for the violence committed against them. Within a culture that views women's bodies as not belonging fully to themselves, and which denies their full and equal autonomy, men in positions of power — be they police officers like Cooper or former football stars like Darren Sharper — may dehumanize and punish women by abusing their sexuality.
    To be sure, this specific incarnation of police brutality is reminiscent of cases of sexual assault among athletesfraternities or within other masculine-centered spaces. The recent viral segment "Football Town Nights" from the sketch series Inside Amy Schumer skewered the way such spaces may encourage either abuse of power or lack of broader social response in its wake.
    Perhaps less commonly, sexual misconduct also impacts boys and men. A 16-year-old named Darrin Manning was picked up by police in January 2014. As he and his friends walked from the subway, police told the Philadelphia Inquirer, one of his schoolmates "caught the attention" of the officers. The students ran, and Manning was apprehended. During a "pat-down," a female officer groped Manning so violently his testicle ruptured, according to the Inquirer.
    Certainly, there is a need for the public to insist "Hands Up! Don't Shoot" in the presence of officers. But it's just as important to insist that raised arms are not a sign welcoming sexual assault from a callous officer who doesn't care about the bodies and humanities of women.
    So how to fight back? "To stop unfit officers from moving from one department to another, most states can decertify officers who engage in misconduct, curbing mistreatment of women," Jacob said. "Studies of decertification both in Florida between 1976 and 1983 and in Missouri in 1999 found that sexual abuse of women was the most frequent reason for decertification in cases involving public, official misconduct."
    We won't be able to stop this specific strain of violence until we first commit to tackling the sexism embedded in American culture. We must insist that violence against women matters because women's bodies and sexual autonomy matter — despite an apparent insistence they don't.

    Thursday, September 21, 2017

    Washington State Legislation 2018 #NoMorePoliceSexualAbuse


    Eight Years of Living Hell & I've not stopped yet!

    Leg 2018, Rep Goodman. I can be ready, with documentation of reported Police Sexual Abuse from many PD's, as I've been filing Public Records Requests, and some have already come back.

    Fyi- The pattern is very clear! "Inconclusive" over & over & over. Because 99%  of reported Police Sexual Abuse & Misconducts, are investigated internally. Does not take a Law Degree or a Degree in CJ, to figure this one out.

    I was not as "ready" to testify for your c
    ommittee, when you asked, but I sure as heck will be by Leg 2018.  

    With "The Donald" Squatting in Our House! There is No Way in **** any Democrat has any time, or energy, to deal with anything but that Sexist, Phyco, Sob! Dear Lord I pray Robert Mueller, and his team of Scary ass lawyers fry that Orange Sob, and get him the hell out of our house!  

    Hopefully, by Leg 2018, we can get together w/Derek (Hi Derek) and really put together a game plan for me to give all of you what I have, that will show beyond any doubt, that WA State Must have standards & regulations pertaining to Police Sexual Abuse & how these cases are investigated. 

    See ya in 2018, Rep Goodman. Please never forget about your Young Woman on the Cat Walk... Please, Rep Goodman... Please do not forget how she touched your heart and the new laws you- You, Roger, passed that has now saved many others, just like her, from the same pain.

    Hope to see all of you in Oly, 2018.
    #NoMorePoliceSexualAbuse
    #StrongWomenRule
    #NeverSurrender #NeverGiveUpTheFight

    Missbrenslaw.blogspot.com 

    #NoRegrets & #NoMorePoliceSexualAbuse 

    Tuesday, September 12, 2017

    Out of the Darkness 💔😪 Olympia Walk to #FightSuicide


    2008... I truly believed it was over... No More living in the hell of Suicide as my go to option... I was done! It was over... I was "free". Free from Abuse... Free from Suicide... I Announced my new Freedom with Pride & Joy, with all I knew. A year later I was Reporting #PoliceSexualAbuse and Instantly went back to suicide. 

    Walk 2-Stop Suicide in WA State

    Miss Kennedy
    Olympia Walk
    DONATE
    My Story
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    Please Join Me in Supporting the 

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. 

    I'm walking in the Out of the Darkness Olympia Walk to fight suicide and support AFSP's bold goal to 
    reduce the suicide rate 20% by 2025. 
    #NeverSurrender #NeverGiveUpTheFight
    #MissBrensLaw Committing Suicide is like getting a bad haircut. Except this time... It won't grow back"

    Hello Everyone. I am participating in Olympia Walk -To #StopSuicide (even my own) Please support me with a donation, if you can. Your emotional support is still so very needed. Money does not "Stop" suicide, but it sure does help in the research that someday could. Mother always said "If you have one dollar & you get another, and another, then soon you have $5.00. Two $5.00's makes $10.00 and two $10.00's make $20.00". What she was really saying (in her Annoying Mother way) is "Every Dollar Counts" ~

    If you are able... To stop just one Suicide is worth that one dollar. Please Make a Donation Today & I promise, rain or shine, to walk my little heart out, on the 30th, to earn every dollar, because Today could be the day to save a life, that with one last tear... could end Tomorrow.
    Campaign created 51 months ago
    Created July 11, 2013
    No-More Legal-Abuse Bren 



    Miss Kennedy

    DONATE
    Please Join Me in Supporting the 
    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. 
    I'm walking in the Out of the Darkness Olympia Walk to fight suicide and support AFSP's bold goal to 
    reduce the suicide rate 20% by 2025. 
    #NeverSurrender 💪🎓👠 #NeverGiveUpTheFight
    #MissBrensLaw Committing Suicide is like getting a bad haircut. Except this time... It won't grow back"
    Hello Everyone. I am participating in Olympia Walk -To #StopSuicide (even my own) Please support me with a donation, if you can. Your emotional support is still so very needed. Money does not "Stop" suicide, but it sure does help in the research that someday could. Mother always said "If you have one dollar & you get another, and another, then soon you have $5.00. Two $5.00's makes $10.00 and two $10.00's make $20.00". What she was really saying (in her Annoying Mother way) is "Every Dollar Counts" ~
    If you are able... To stop just one Suicide is worth that one dollar. Please Make a Donation Today & I promise, rain or shine, to walk my little heart out, on the 30th, to earn every dollar, because Today could be the day to save a life, that with one last tear... could end Tomorrow. 
    http://bndfr.com/6zPP3
    If you are in crisis, 
    call 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline